Japan Hit by Typhoon 12: First of It's Type in History!

Kawana Typhoon

First typhoon recorded to have approached Japan from the eastern seaboard and traverse it to the south. An omen of what is to come?

Japan experiences many typhoons annually, but Typhoon 12 was the first in recorded history to ever come out of the Pacific ocean from the east and cross to the west. All other typhoons have come up from the south and traverse northerly generally following up the islands of Kyushu, Shikoku, Honshu, and lastly over Hokkaido. The path taken this time is one that is customarily seen in early and mid-summer but much further south with the typhoon traversing the Philippines or Taiwan and ending up in Vietnam or China. Later in the summer they begin turning to the north hitting Okinawa, Kyushu, Honshu, as well as Korea. Later in the year, air pressure systems generally force the typhoons further to the east missing Japan completely as seen in the accompanying diagram.

Japanese Language Lesson: The numbers represent the month of the year. For example 7 (shichi:七) is July. The kanji (Chinese Character) following the number,  月, is read as gatsu and means month. So July is 7月 (shichigatsu:七月). 月 is also read as tsuki and means the moon. So the seventh full moon of the year becomes July! If you are interested in learning more about the Japanese language, you may want to take a look at Japanese from Zero. I find it particularly interesting as it provides you with hiragana, katagana, and kanji writing systems as you study.

If you are interested in learning Japanese and live in the area of Surprise Arizona, send an email to me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and maybe we can setup some lessons using this book!

Image from http://weathernews.jp
Early typhoons generally traverse over the Philippines into southeast China. Later in the summer over Japan from the south and then curve to east not making landfall later in the year.

Have fun while learning Japanese! This book approaches the Japanese language from a very practical viewpoint and integrates learning the Japanese writing systems at the same time.

Jim Parker